EVALUATION OF CANAVALIA PLAGIOSPERMA SEED MEAL AS FEED INGREDIENT IN POULTRY DIETS

AUTHOR: ANUMNI, POLYCARP EZIOKWU (MSc)

DEPARTMENT: ANIMAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

AFFILIATION: FEDERAL UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY OWERRI

Three experiments were conducted to evaluate the nutritive value of Canavalia plagiosperma seed meal for poultry. Canavalia plagiosperma seeds were divided into four batches: The first batch was processed raw; the second batch was cooked for 60 minutes, dried and milled into a meal. The third batch was first cooked for 60 minutes, and water was discarded, fresh water was added and cooked again for another 60 minutes, decanted, dried and milled into a meal (two-stage cooking). The fourth batch was toasted for 30 minutes and milled into a meal. These meals were used to formulate broiler starter, finisher and layers rations at 0%, 10% and 20% inclusion levels respectively.

In the first experiment, seven broiler starter diets were formulated to contain processed raw, one-stage cooked and toasted Canavalia plagiosperma seed meal at 0%, 10% and 20% dietary levels, respectively. Two hundred and ten (210) day-old chicks of Marshal Strain were divided into seven (7) batches of 30 chicks each and randomly assigned to the seven (7) dietary treatments in a completely randomized design and fed for 21 days. Each group was further subdivided into two (2) replicates of 15 birds each. There were significant (P<0.05) differences among the treatment groups in feed intake, body weight gain and feed conversion ratio. the group on control, (0%) Canavalia plagiosperma diet had significantly higher body weight gain and feed intake than the other groups.

In the second experiment, two-stage cooked Canavalia plagiosperma seed meal was used in formulating three broiler finisher diets at 0%, 10% and 20% dietary levels, respectively. Two hundred and seventy (270), 5-week old broilers of Marshal Strain were divided into three groups of ninety (90) birds each and randomly assigned to the three (3) treatment diets of three replicates each with 30 birds per replicate in a completely randomized design and fed for 28 days. There were significant (p<0.05) differences among the treatment groups in feed intake, body weight gain and fed conversion ratio. The group fed 0% two-stage cooked Canavalia plagiosperma seed meal recorded significantly higher body weight gain (p<0.05)    and feed intake than the other groups.

In the third experiment, two-stage cooked Canavalia plagiosperma seed meal was used to formulate three layers diets at 0%, 10% and 20% dietary levels respectively. Two hundred and forty (240), Shika brown layers, four months in lay were divided into three groups of 80 birds each and randomly assigned to the three dietary treatments in a completely randomized design and fed for 90 days. Each group was further subdivided into 2 replicates of 40 birds each. There were significant (p<0.05) differences in feed intake, feed conversion ratio and egg weight among the treatment groups. However, there were no significant (p>0.05) differences in hen-day production, shell   thickness, yolk index and yolk colour among the treatment groups. The results of these experiments suggested that while de-emphasizing inclusion of raw or toasted Canavalia plagiosperma seed meal in poultry diets, farmers should incorporate one-stage or two-stage cooked Canavalia plagiosperma seed meal at 10% dietary level.

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