3D PRINTERS IN THE LIBRARY: TOWARDS A FABLAB IN THE ACADEMIC LIBRARY

AUTHORS: KURT, LISA AND COLEGROVE, TOD

AFFILIATION: ACRL TechConnect

The DeLaMare Science & Engineering Library at the University of Nevada, Reno, recently added two 3D printers, along with a 3D scanner and supporting software, to its collection. In the spirit of sharing the tremendous excitement involved in providing a 3D printer to our community, we hope our successful experience may be of use to others as you make the case for your own library. We’ll cover the opportunities libraries can embrace with the potential 3D printing brings, what exactly 3D printing is, how 3D printing, making, and fabrication enhances and perhaps changes learning, and to illustrate we’ll talk about what we’re doing here in DeLaMare. What’s a 3D Printer? In a manner similar to printing images on paper, a “3D printer” is a type of additive manufacturing: a three-dimensional object is created by laying down successive layers of material that adhere to one another, creating a three-dimensional output. What the material is composed of varies from one manufacturer to the next including:

  • fine cornstarch held together by “watered-down superglue”
  • ABS plastic (think Legos!) with each layer literally melted onto the other
  • high-end photopolymer printers where each layer is “printed” by flashing a 2-D image of the layer onto a thin film of a photoreactive layer deposited on the growing surface of the object, the process is similar: the three-dimensional object is constructed by printing and adhering one layer at a time.

TO VIEW THE FULL CONTENT, PLEASE FOLLOW THIS LINK: http://acrl.ala.org/techconnect/post/category/library-as-makerspace

 

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This is the site which is used to showcase the resources, operations and services of the University Library of the premier university of Technology in Nigeria. We have so much indigenous resources which people may wish to look at and use .
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